Janet Massie of Massie Staffys – Pit Bulls were NEVER “Nanny Dogs” 5


Monroe breeder and her dog head to national AKC show this weekend

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Ginger gives her owner, Janet Massie, a kiss Sunday morning. They will head to Orlando this weekend for the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship.

Posted: Wednesday, December 10, 2014 4:15 pm – Sherese Gore

Among the 32 Staffordshire bull terriers to strut and trot across the stage at the 14th annual AKC/Eukanuba National Championship this weekend will be one local pup.

Grand Champion Massie’s Dancing on the Clouds, otherwise known as Ginger, will take the stage in Orlando. The 3-year-old dog belongs to Janet Massie and her husband, Dwayne, owners of Massie Staffys, a breeding business in Monroe.

Staffordshire bull terriers originated in England and weigh around 30 to 40 pounds. In that country, they have obtained the nickname of “nanny dogs” because of their affectionate nature and their love for children, Janet said.

Click here to read more

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The Staffordshire Bull Terrier originates from the region of Staffordshire, England in the 19th century and is genetically related to the Mastiff and the Bull Terrier. When bear- and bull-baiting were banned, people who’d made a living off that bloodsport started mixing the Elizabethan bear-baiting, bull-baiting mastiff type ‘Bulldogs’ with terriers to reduce their size.  The goal was to get a smaller, more agile dog that would be fit for dogfighting instead of attacking larger animals. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a local version of the various fighting dogs that resulted, originating in the coal mining areas of Staffordshire, England. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier, like all breeds, retains the traits its forebears were bred for – in this case, the trait referred to as “gameness”. “Gameness” is an eagerness to engage in fighting activities and willingness to continue despite injury or pain to the attacking dog.  Originally no more than 16” at the shoulder, these Mastiff / ‘molosser’ descendants were classified as terriers by the British Kennel Club in 1935, partly to disguise their fighting history. The breed wasn’t recognized by the AKC until 1975. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is nowadays often much larger, thus losing the main difference that distinguished them from the American Pit Bull Terrier and the American Staffordshire Terrier. The Staffordshire is a Pit Bull type breed.

 

In North America, from 1982-2013, Pit Bull breeds and mixes have seriously attacked 2,990 humans that resulted in 1,777 maimings and 275 deaths.

In the United Kingdom, where the breed originated, from June 2013 to February 2014 Staffordshire Bull Terriers and other Pit Bull breeds have maimed 13 people and killed 4.

Click here to read more about the Staffordshire Bull Terrier

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POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS DOG BREEDS

This is a list of dog breeds that have a history of being potentially dangerous to people, especially children. Daxton’s Friends for Canine Education and Awareness understands that any dog has the ability to bite or inflict serious harm to humans. This list consists of several dog breeds that have a higher than average number of recorded human fatalities. Please use extreme caution if you choose to bring one of these breeds into your home. Rental communities and homeowners insurance may restrict many of the dog breeds on this list due to the likelihood of a serious incident.

Pit Bulls, Mastiff, and Rottweiler lead in fatalities and are listed first. The rest of the breeds are listed in alphabetical order:

Pit Bull Terrier Family

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“PIT BULLS USED TO BE NANNY DOGS” 

The Myth:
To explain vintage black and white photographs that depicted children and pit bulls together, a story was created that back in the Victorian age the pit bull was the “nanny dog”. These so-called nanny dogs were said to be so good with children parents relied on them to babysit and protect them.

The Reality:
One fighting breed advocate created this “legend” in 1971 to distance her breed from its fighting origins. This mention was picked up by a newspaper in 1987 and has since been promoted as historical “fact.”

At no point in history were pit bulls ever “nanny dogs”. There has not been any proof ever given to make this myth a reality. The pit bull advocacy group “BADRAP” (Bay Area Dog Lovers Responsible About Pit Bulls) recently admitted that pit bulls were never nanny dogs and that this myth was dangerous to children. The retraction of the “nanny dog myth” has been highly publicized. Despite the retraction, the myth has lived on and pit bull advocates still repeat it regularly

“Did you know that there was never such thing as a ‘Nanny’s Dog’? This term was a recent invention created to describe the myriad of vintage photos of children enjoying their family pit bulls (click this link for details about vintage photos). While the intention behind the term was innocent, using it may mislead parents into being careless with their children around their family dog – A recipe for dog bites!”


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5 thoughts on “Janet Massie of Massie Staffys – Pit Bulls were NEVER “Nanny Dogs”

  • Roy Barbour

    Ok. Seriously, people need to stop with all this being stereotype with Pitbulls and other dogs. I have A lot of staffys they are not pit bulls and I have never once been attacked or bitten by one or seen aggression. They are very loving and affectionate animals.
    It’s really all in how you raise them. They are great with children! I have 4 sisters and 2 brothers. I am 18 and have been around dogs all my life they are very sweet and comforting creatures!
    Indeed I find with a lot of them their mentality is more different than that of a pit-bull. I think in a way they are more shy. For example, If you raise a pit-bull and they were never socialized around other dogs or people it’s most likely they will attack. After all that is their instinct to protect. With any type of animal.
    Like if a dog has puppies and a stranger comes over ,they are scared.
    People have given Pitbulls a bad reputation by how they were raised. In England mind you they raised Pitbulls to do fights for money….

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      The Staffordshire Bull Terrier originates from the region of Staffordshire, England in the 19th century and is genetically related to the Mastiff and the Bull Terrier. When bear- and bull-baiting were banned, people who’d made a living off that bloodsport started mixing the Elizabethan bear-baiting, bull-baiting mastiff type ‘Bulldogs’ with terriers to reduce their size. The goal was to get a smaller, more agile dog that would be fit for dogfighting instead of attacking larger animals. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a local version of the various fighting dogs that resulted, originating in the coal mining areas of Staffordshire, England. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier, like all breeds, retains the traits its forebears were bred for – in this case, the trait referred to as “gameness”. “Gameness” is an eagerness to engage in fighting activities and willingness to continue despite injury or pain to the attacking dog. Originally no more than 16” at the shoulder, these Mastiff / ‘molosser’ descendants were classified as terriers by the British Kennel Club in 1935, partly to disguise their fighting history. The breed wasn’t recognized by the AKC until 1975. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is nowadays often much larger, thus losing the main difference that distinguished them from the American Pit Bull Terrier and the American Staffordshire Terrier. The Staffordshire is a Pit Bull type breed.

      The Staffordshire Bull Terrier can be a difficult and challenging breed to own. They can be very affectionate with their families and may be friendly to most strangers, but they are often wary of certain people and this is often unforeseeable. Despite being bonded to their families, there are cases where they have been aggressive or attacked a family member. At times, they can display unpredictable behaviors such as hostility and fear. They are happy dogs with an enthusiastic nature. They can be very energetic, and can lack boundaries, by jumping up, over licking, or pawing people. They have a tendency to chew and enjoy playing with chew toys. They are not recommended for owners who would like an even tempered dog. The breed is known to be fearless and often will hurt themselves by doing things such as jumping through windows or breaking through fences. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier can do well with children, but extreme caution should be taken due to their breed history and strength. Despite the often cited myth that this dog was a “nanny dog”, there is no evidence in history that they were ever bred to do well with or “babysit” children. One of the largest Pit Bull advocacy groups, Bad Rap, recently retracted the “nanny dog” myth and does not recommend Pit Bull types breeds around children.
      https://www.facebook.com/BADRAP.org/posts/10151460774472399

      This canine can do well with other animals if raised with them, but it is advised never to leave a Staffordshire Bull Terrier with other pets unsupervised. Staffordshire Bull Terriers often can be aggressive with unfamiliar animals and have been known to attack animals such as cats, dogs, horses and other livestock. There have been instances where they have been aggressive suddenly with animals they were raised with. Caution and careful observation should always be taken when introducing them to unfamiliar animals. They are not suitable for off leash dogs parks.

      The Staffordshire Bull Terrier needs proper socialization and training at an early age. They are high energy and can be a challenge to manage. They require a firm and consistent owner. They are very strong and handlers need to be in control at all times. Even with proper training and socialization, they can be difficult to control, displaying unwanted behaviors, including spontaneous outbursts of aggression. Also, we are talking about socialization to humans here. No amount of socialization will make a Staffordshire Bull Terrier less unpredictably aggressive towards other animals.

      Staffordshire Bull Terriers need regular vigorous daily exercise. They are active indoors and outdoors. Long daily walks and play time can be ideal. If they do not receive enough exercise, they can become bored and destructive. Due to their energy and stamina, they can make great jogging partners.

      Staffordshire Bull Terriers have minimal grooming requirements. They are prone to medical issues such as eye issues, hip dysplasia, and mast cell tumors. Common behavioral issues include OCDs and rage syndrome. They weigh between 23-40 lbs and can live 11-13 years.

      In North America, from 1982-2013, Pit Bull breeds and mixes have seriously attacked 2,990 humans that resulted in 1,777 maimings and 275 deaths.

      In the United Kingdom, where the breed originated, from June 2013 to February 2014 Staffordshire Bull Terriers and other Pit Bull breeds have maimed 13 people and killed 4.

      2014 Dog Bite Related Fatalities as of (12/12/14)
      Updated after each fatality following fact finding research

      40 Dog Bite Related Fatalities
      by Breed:
      25 by Pit Bull / Pit Bull Mix
      3 by Bullmastiff / Mastiff Mix
      4 by Rottweiler
      1 by Cane Corso
      1 by Shepherd Mix
      1 by Catahoula Leopard Dog
      4 Unknown Breed
      1 Mix Breed

      By age:
      20 Children
      20 Adults

      By State:
      TX – 6 deaths
      AL – 3 deaths
      OH – 3 deaths
      FL – 5 deaths
      NC – 4 deaths
      MI – 2 deaths
      AZ – 1 death
      CA – 2 death
      CT – 2 death
      DE – 1 death
      IL – 1 death
      LA – 2 death
      MS – 2 death
      NJ – 1 death
      MO – 1 death
      AR – 1 death
      WI – 1 death
      WY – 1 death
      SD – 1 death

      Names and ages of the deceased:
      Christina Bell-Burleson – 43 – Houston, TX – 2 Pit Bulls [01.05.14]
      Betty Clark – 75 – Canyon Lake, TX – 2 Pit Bulls [01.06.14]
      Kara Hartrich – 4 – Bloomington, IL – 2 Pit Bulls [01.17.14]
      Annabel Martin – 89 – Corona, CA – 3 Rottweilers [01.26.14]
      Klonda Richey – 57 – Dayton, OH – 2 Mastiff Mixes [02.07.14]
      Je’vaeh Mayes – 2 – Temple, TX – Pit Bull [02.17.14]
      Braelynn Coulter – 3 – High Point, NC – Pit Bull [02.24.14]
      Summer Sears – 4 – Tallassee, AL – Shepherd Mix [02.26.14]
      Kenneth Santillan – 13 – Paterson, NJ – Bullmastiff [02.28.14]
      Raymane Robinson, Jr. – 2 – Killeen, TX – Bullmastiff [03.01.14]
      Nancy Newberry – 77 – Phoenix, AZ – Pit Bull [03.14.14]
      Mia DeRouen – 4 – Houma, LA – Pit Bull [03.25.14]
      Christopher Malone- 3 – Holmes County, MS – 2 Pit Bulls [03.31.14]
      Dorothy Hamilton – 85 – Kaufman, TX – 2 Pit Bulls [03.31.14]
      John Harvard – 5 – Riverside, AL – Pit Bull [04.06.14]
      Petra Aguirre – 83 – San Antonio, TX – Pit Bull Mix [04.11.14]
      Jessica Norman – 33 – Sebring, FL – 3 Pit Bulls [4.30.14]
      Katie Morrison – 20 – Phenix City, AL – 3 Pit Bulls [05.03.14]
      Nyhiem Wilfong – 1 – Caldwell County, NC – Rottweiler [05.04.14]
      Kasii Haith – 4 – Kent County, DE – 3 Pit Bulls [05.07.14]
      Rita Pepe – 93 – Branford, CT – Pit Bull Mix [05.25.14]
      Holden Garrison – 10 wks – Davisburg, MI – Catahoula Leopard Dog [06.09.14]
      Logan Shepard – 4 – Riverview, FL – 2 Pit Bulls [07.19.14]
      Jonathan Quarles – 7 mo – Dayton, OH – Pit Bull [07.20.14]
      Craig Sytsma – 46 – Metamore Twp, MI – 2 Cane Corso [07.23.14]
      Cindy Whisman – 59 – Madison Twp, OH – Pit Bull [08.04.14]
      Joel Chireieleison – 6 – Fanning Springs, FL – 2 Pit Bulls [08.07.14]
      Deriah Solem – 22 mo – St Charles County, MO – Pit Bull Mix [08.09.14]
      Javon Dade – 4 – Miami, FL – Pit Bull [08.13.14]
      David Glass Sr.-51-Benton County, MS – 3 Pit Bulls [09.20.14]
      Alice Payne – 75 – Cave City, AR – 1 Pit Bull [09.26.14]
      Juan Fernandez – 59 – Modesto, CA – 4 Pit Bulls – [10.14.14]
      Logan Thomas Meyer – 7 – Hustisford, WI -1 Rottweiler – [10.24.14]
      Alemeaner Dial – 83 – Robeson County, N.C. – 4 Pit Bulls – [10.31.14]
      Deanne Lynn Coando – 40 – Wind River Indian Reservation, WY – Unknown – [11. .14]
      Stella Antanaitis – 91 – Stamford, CT – Mix Breed – [11. .14]
      Jayla Rodriguez – 8 – Pine Ridge, SD – Unknown – [11.18.14]
      Bobbie Cheveallier – 85 – Grant Parish, L.A. – Unknown – [12.1.14]
      Jose Robles – 62 – Madison, N.C. – Pending – [11.23.14]
      Christopher Camejo – 2 – Crystal River , FL – Rottweiler’s – [12.6.14]

      Non – Bite Related Canine Deaths

      Demonta Collins – 13 – Augusta, GA – Chased into traffic by at large Pit Bull [04.10.14]
      Davon Jigget – 17 – Fulton County, Ga – Chased into traffic by at large Pit Bull [04.11.14]
      Ryan Brown – 15 – Fayette County, TN – Killed by pan thrown by brother when attempting to break up dog fight [08.08.14]

      On average so far this year someone has been killed by a pit bull every 12 days. Some of these pit bull attacks were from the family dog that was well trained and had never shown signs of aggression before. The only common in these severe and often fatal attacks is not abuse or lack of training it is breed. Choose the breed of dog you trust the lives of your loved ones with wisely.