Chase Anthony – survivor – Mauled by his grandmother’s pit bull at the age of 8 months 16


10589790_280740532133709_1430744786_nWrittin by Renee Rosati: (Chase’s mother)

Pit bulls and fighting breed dogs are an increasing public safety issue for families and communities everywhere. Not many people dare to speak out and consequently many victims live in silence. Victims of dog attacks get harassed, threatened, guilted into hiding and their family’s safety becomes threatened. If you, the reader, would please just take a few more days of your time and hear from the victims and survivors and see the truth of why we as advocates try to spread public awareness. This is so important!  If you open your heart you will see how much you really mean to a lot of people and how just you’re simple support in any way will softened the hearts of so many suffering from these animal attacks. You will give so many of us some peace of mind and hope that we just may have our voices heard and save more lives. This may spare another child the horrific pain or a violent savage death.

This is Chase’s story with photos after 8.5 hours of surgery. We still don’t know how he survived this horrific mauling. This is from my personal journal entries a few days after the attack:

This day January 11, 2011 started out as a normal work morning. Me, Chase and his dad got up and drove Chase to his grandmother’s house in Drexel Hill. When we arrived, our son was his usual self, smiling and happy. We kissed him goodbye and left him with his grandmother to babysit. As we were pulling out of the driveway they were standing at the door and Chase was waving good-bye. I did not realize that was going to be the last time I would see my son’s beautiful face with both eyes wide opened smiling back at me.

At 11:30am that day, I got a disturbing visit from Chase’s grandfather who works at HUP with me, he entered my office out of breath and his face told it all. Without words, I 10656473_280740555467040_401436175_nknew it was my son. I immediately stood and told him NO!  This isn’t happening!  He wouldn’t tell me what was happening or how bad it was. All he said was “get your things and come on.” I was about to face ANY mother’s worst fear. Walking through the halls and out the door over to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, (CHOP) was like walking to my own funeral, I thought, OK, it may not be that bad then as I entered CHOP ER I saw the look on the security officers and the staff and JUST lost it. I knew right then and there that IT was bad. They put me in a room and told me my son needed immediate surgery and had been seriously injured by the vicious pit bull attack. They brought me and Dominic into the room where Chase was and my legs went weak. My personal nightmare had begun.

I saw my son flailing his arms and legs while screaming and shaking his head back and forth. He was covered in his own blood. I felt as if someone was stabbing me from behind. I couldn’t understand not being able to grab my son and tell him mommy was there and he would be OK. They took us out of the room for what felt like a lifetime of surgery. At 12pm January 11th Chase went into to the operating room (OR) and we were brought to the OR waiting area. We were trying to comprehend what was happening but all we could do is sit there and wait. Doctors were coming in and out of the room for consents to repair the many extensive injuries. My world was being turned upside down minute by minute.

First, plastic surgery came to explain the lacerations that were made on the left side of his cheek with numerous puncture holes. The worst injury was the deep laceration that started from one side under his neck to the other coming up ripping the chin off. This exposed the nerve inside Chase’s mouth. Then, in came the eye surgeon with the news that Chase’s left orbital socket had been crushed and the tooth of the dog went through his skull and into the back of the eye.  Consequently, they needed to place metal plates in his face. They also had to repair the tear duct system, which was severely lacerated and a plastic stint would need to be inserted. I just kept telling each doctor “PLEASE take care of my baby, please help him”. Just when I thought I heard it all, the ENT surgeon came in with the most horrifying news! They found that Chase’s tongue was torn almost completely off from the back only leaving a millimeter of his tongue left. Also, about 3 inches of the front of the tongue was severely severed. They weren’t sure if they could get the blood supply back to the tongue. The image I got at in my mind at that moment was OMG! The animal had attacked my son viciously and mauled him horribly.

10695225_280741192133643_696659701_nI felt sick not knowing how scared and how much pain my son was feeling. I wasn’t there to console or protect him. I was left sitting with the image of my baby never being able to talk or eat again with no tongue! Then a nurse came in to tell us he needed to go to x-ray for a computerized tomography or CT to be done because they thought his jaw was broken. They asked if we wanted to see him quickly before they took him. As I walked into the hallway the shock set in and I saw Chase, my baby. He didn’t even look like my son. His head was three times the normal size. As I got closer, all I could see was my son’s eyelid resting on his cheek mangled. They said “go ahead and kiss him.” I leaned over to kiss his forehead and told him “Mommy is here, Hold on and fight. I love you.” As they wheeled him away all I could think about was how helpless I felt. I couldn’t control my thoughts. I thought, Oh God, he is probably wondering where his Mommy and Daddy were while he was being mauled. He must have been so scared and in so much pain. After the scan, the doctor came back in to inform us of more horrifying news. Our son’s bowels where inflamed and had shut down from all the trauma his little body had been through and was still being put through.  From the amount of blood loss, his blood pressure was going up and down he needed 2 blood transfusions. How could this be happening? I just kept asking myself why?? Why him?? He is just a baby.

At 8:30pm, 8.5 hours later the surgeries were finished. They took us up to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit PICU, 7 South and told us we would have to wait about 45 minutes to see him. I was so anxious to see my baby after 8 hours and at the same time I was nervous to go into the room and see him. I tried my best to remain calm during this time. Walking into his room I saw my baby boy lying in his hospital bed with tubes coming out of everywhere and his body so swollen. All I could do was stand there helpless and watch my baby fight for his life.

To fast forward, little Chase was improving medically. For me and my family, it was just the beginning of a long journey to recovery. My son was unable to drink a bottle unable to take a binky which had been his comfort in the past. During the day, all we could do is walk him around and hold him, he didn’t want to be put down. At night I would have to hold and rock him while listening to him scream for hours until he passed out from exhaustion.  Then, we would sit up with him after only an hour of sleep after he woke up crying. Next he began to cry in his sleep and whine; the nurses said he could be subconsciously remembering the attack. This just broke my heart even more. Our minds and spirit couldn’t take any more. Night after night this repeated and were could do nothing to help him. Knowing our baby had a long hard road ahead of him still was breaking us apart.

10685204_280741195466976_855769894_nThe time came when Chase was discharged. Two days of being home and going through more of this nightmare nearly impossible. We were doing our best to keep up with the schedule medications and the timing of the feeds on the tube and trying to settle down a 9 month old in severe pain. I kept praying for the strength to just keep going. My son was in agony and I knew it.  But what was wrong I just couldn’t tell. The worst part is that my son began to reject me and push me away. He became very upset if I would hold him and even if I sat next to him. Heartbroken, I was dying inside. I thought he was associating me with his pain of holding him down to give him the medication and clean his injured eye. It was so hard to think that my son was now afraid of me. I was the one that put him to sleep every night since birth, the one that he hugged and kissed. I couldn’t wrap my mind around what still felt like a dream.

Later that night after hours of crying and rocking and walking around, I decided to try to clean out Chase’s nose. He had what looked like dried blood stuck in his left nostril continuously since the accident. I kept telling nurses and doctors about it because it seemed to make him have trouble breathing. They told me to use saline drops which I did but nothing happened. I laid him down on the changing table and tried to get it out! He screamed and I stopped and I thought, ok I have to be gentle and easy. The whole left side of his face had broken bones and fractures so I tried again. This time Chase cried so hard he held his breath. I sat him up and calmed him down. He started to cough and sneezed really hard!

Out came this rock hard dried up blood clot or so it seemed. Dom was standing there and grabbed it before it went into his mouth. He said “wow, this is rock hard” and he turned to throw it away. Then I heard him say, with his voice cracking and about to cry was “Oh my God, oh my God” and I jumped up and said” what is the matter?” He turned to me and said “it is a TOOTH, a tooth Renee. I think it is the dog’s tooth!” Instantly I was sick to my stomach. MY son had a tooth lodged in his nose for 17 days and that was what was causing the uncontrollable crying. Night after night, my poor baby was suffering agonizing pain. I had been sitting there holding his head to my chest rocking him while he screamed not knowing this sharp edge tooth was jammed in his nose. How in the world did this dog’s tooth get there I wondered? I now understand.

That night my son actually smiled and sat on the floor. He played for 2 hours without crying for the first time in 17 long days. My heart was happy that he was finally active and without 10615834_280741202133642_999454372_nthat bad pain. On the other hand, I was sick with disgust of what had happened. I could go on and on because our happiness was very short lived and the constant crying and wondering what was wrong started again. But, we wanted to do whatever it took to help our dear child. Still, we wondered when the struggle would ever end.

Chase is now 4 and the aftermath of the mauling is ongoing.  The center of our lives is this attack and everything that has come about has been a result of this attack. I try to share my experience and help others to be aware of the aftermath of living as a survivor. To me, life will never be the same. My son struggles with so many challenges on a daily basis. I, myself, have issues from this tragedy. My whole family has experienced heartache, sadness, loss and the feeling of family being torn apart. We have endured financial problems and my life has been turned upside down for 4 years. Sometimes I think like there is no end in sight. Even though my son’s injuries have healed and closed, the wounds on the inside never will. It seems that trying to move on from that day will be nearly impossible.

Every step my son will take for years to come will lead us right back to that day. Chase is blind in his left eye, has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), behavioral problems, social emotional problems, speech problems and feeding problems He  is developmentally  delayed, has Bell’s palsy on his left side, suffers seizures and on medications from scar tissue on his brain from being shaken by the dog. These are the things people fail to see after someone has been attacked and their wounds close. They don’t realize how much it changes a person’s life. As the parent of a surviving victim, could you imagine hearing and seeing people value a dog’s life more than a human life?

______________________________________________________________________________________

A Message from Renee Rosati

The dog was raised from six-weeks old, very well cared for by a 56 year-old woman, no signs of aggression and had a good relationship with the dog. I lived with the dog for a year before Chase was born with my daughter and it would sleep and cuddle with me. He was a neutered male. The dog came out of nowhere and grabbed my son who didn’t walk or crawl yet. Chase was on the floor with his 22 year-old uncle. He had to fight it off and raise my son above his head while kicking the dog and backing out of the house where he then called 911. The dog continued to try to get Chase. He wasn’t finished attacking. The pit bull was 6-year-old when it suddenly snapped and tried to kill my son.

As I see it, this is a big problem in the world we now live in. We need help to save people’s lives! Pets suffer similar tragedies and deaths. Thank you for taking your time to listen. I hope people understand and see exactly how it feels to victims during that moment. Know this; it is not over after the wounds heal. A pit bull mauling changes your life forever.

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Chase pit bull

American Pit Bull Terrier

The American Pit Bull Terrier is, like all the ‘bully’ breeds, one of this group of descendants of the British ‘bull and terrier’ type fighting bulldogs. Once imported into the United States, it was bred up to be bigger again, and again used in baiting animals and in dogfighting. The American Kennel Club (founded 1884) was unwilling to register these fighting dogs, so in 1898 the United Kennel Club was founded specifically to register working pit-fighting dogs and to promote dogfighting. In order to be registered, a dog had to first win three pit fights7,8,9. The American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) became a ‘breed’. As dogfighting declined in popularity in the 1930s and 1940s, Colby (the most famous and prolific breeder of these dogs) began to search for a new market and began promoting the APBT as family pets10,11. This despite the fact that his breeding lines included child killers12.

It is recommended that American Pit Bull Terrier owners have and carry a break stick17. A break stick is a device designed to open a Pit Bull type dog’s mouth while it is engaged in fighting. Pit Bull type breeds have a very distinctive fighting style and often will latch on their opponent and not let go. They usually will shake the other animal violently when they are latched on. This can cause horrific damage quickly. The break stick was designed by dog fighters to be inserted into the Pit Bull’s mouth and release his grip. The original purpose was to safely end a dog fight. The break stick often is the ONLY thing that will release the dog’s grip. People have been known to hit Pit Bulls with objects such as a bat or even shoot them and the dog still will not let go. Bully Breed owners should always have one handy in cause of an emergency. The break stick is not safe to use on other breeds of dogs and is only recommended for dogs in the Pit Bull family that were once used for dog fighting purposes.

Click here to learn more about the American Pit Bull Terrier

Pit Bull Terrier Family


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16 thoughts on “Chase Anthony – survivor – Mauled by his grandmother’s pit bull at the age of 8 months

  • Carla White

    Renee, thank you for your work on getting people more aware of the heartbreaking problem of pits.I respect you very much. Is there anything you can think of now that might have been able to let you see the danger to your family before the attack sufficiently for your son not to have been exposed to a pit bull? I know it’s a somewhat hypothetical question.

  • Pat Gilmore

    My parents had 2 pits one was a baby her whole life till she passes I trusted her like any
    Dog she was sweet! But she passed & they got another one I called him son of Sam! I had 2 more children & I could not have them near h of he acted like he wanted to eat them. My parents lived out of town so when I visited they had to put him in a cage I never trusted him. Praise God I never went through what you did & I pray for your family for this situation for it can rip a family apart! Prayers for your family & your little sons life!!

  • KaD

    I don’t know how many times I’ve said “DON’T let your child go to a home with a pit bull”, no matter how nice the owner thinks it is. It is classic pit bull behavior to be fine for YEARS, then suddenly kill. Look at what happened to Beau Rutledge.

    FYI, if you know someone who is suffering from PTSD or trauma, even a small child like this, google EMT practitioners in your area. EMOTIONAL FREEDOM TECHNIQUE is simple enough for a child to do, is based on neuroscience, and it helped me a great deal. It’s not even expensive. Studies have shown is it very effective even in severe cases like for combat veterans.

  • Ginny Polidori

    ANGELIQUE – Chase is my nephew and let me be the first one to tell you that you sound like a fucking idiot!!!! Do u not see the pictures of him? If u know so much about the breed and other dogs, then explain to me why Pitt Bulls have the MOST attacks when it comes to statistics?!?!?! Why won’t insurance companies cover your house if you have one? Why are so many states BANNING Pitt Bulls altogether?!?!? Why are there so many people having to beat a Pitt Bull off of a person they are attacking with shovels because they wont unlock their jaw to let their prey lose? For someone who knows so much about them, u really do sound stupid. And for u to even put a comment on here that insinuates that Chase did something to that dog in order for him to attack him like that shows that you are the epitome of trash! I’ll be here when you post your bullshit excuse as to why your Pitt Bull attacks you cause I can guarantee that it’s going to happen! I will be more then happy to make sure you blame yourself!!!!!!! Dumbass…

    • Oregonian

      Ginny: I am so sorry for all you and your nephew have had to go through. i am keeping you in prayer. Thank you for sharing your story. Many of us are listening and learning from it.

    • Jerome Davis

      As an uncle myself, I cannot believe that Angelique had the audacity to blame your nephew! So what if your niece or nephew did something to provoke the dog or not! It doesn’t matter! I have a feeling that the attack was unprovoked! It has been proven over and over and over again!

    • Oregonian

      Not so hard to understand… it has been happening way too often. It is becoming clear. These are dangerous dogs that cannot be trusted even when raised in a loving environment as a family pet. Sure, not all pits go bad so PLEASE do not come in here and tell us all about your sweet kissy face that’s been sleeping with your baby and would never hurt a fly. Pray he stays that way.
      Some of them “snap”. And when they do, it’s deadly.

  • Angelique

    I’m very sorry for your son and the trauma he has experienced. My prayers for a s recovery! I would also like to add, unfortunately, that because of your personal experience & it is understandable I find it unfair to try and put all the blame on the dog. I am a foster and resucer & have had numerous dogs myself. I have always kept my children away from certain situations. One main one being when they were young, especially 8 months old, my dogs were kept in a different room as my children. The reason being is children that young get into everything & still lose their balance & fall. I never wanted to take the chance of my child falling or dropping something on my dog & startling him which would bring about him biting which is a dog’s only defense. Any dog can bite & for you to use this unfortunate event to channel how you feel about a certain breed is unfair. I am fostering a small dog right now, part terrier & Dachsund, he has snapped & growled at my children more times than my 13 year old Shepard or my 11 year old Pitbull & he came from a very good home not abused or mistreated. So….he is kept separate from my children so he cannot harm them. An 8 month old baby should not have been around any dog, because any dog can bite, maul, maim & injure…pet or stray.

    • Oregonian

      Angelique: As Ginny pointed out, you are surely an idiot but, how can you be so heartless? I just don’t understand the thought process that goes on behind your remarks?? I am shocked at how uncaring you are. That’s what this article is about… EDUCATING. No, the child did NOTHING, the 22 did NOTHING! It happens all the time! How dare you! Are you unaware (did you NOT read her story?)
      I’m sorry, it just boggles my mind to see one so heartless as yourself bringing MORE pain to this family. Shame on you.
      First, they are attacked by pit bulls, then they are attacked by pit bull owners. Typical!

    • Julie

      Angelique, This family fell for the pro pit bull lobby’s propaganda that pit bulls are nanny dogs that I see pit bull advocates regurgitate all the time. On social media you can see tens of thousands of pictures where babies are laying on their family pit bull. This family thought they had a safe family pit bull. This family was mislead by the pro pit bull lobby that it’s all how you raise them and they are just like other dogs. Other dog breeds do need a break-stick on hand incase of an attack. What most rescues and shelters fail to tell people who adopt pit-bull type dogs; Pit-Bull Rescue Central, the leading authority of pit-bulls recommends all pit guardians to have a “break-stick”,a wedge-shaped piece of wood used to pry open a pit bull’s jaw during an attack . A break-stick is to pry open a pit bull’s jaw during an attack. “Since pit bulls have a strong fighting background, we recommend that owners also have a breaking stick as a precaution. Breaking sticks are not something to brag about and the general pubic might have the wrong impression if you walk around with a stick in your hand. Breaking sticks are not illegal, but they are considered dog fighting paraphernalia in certain states and/or with certain law enforcement agents.” http://www.pbrc.net/breaksticks.html

      This person demonstrates how to use a break stick on a pit-bull: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfMVH4wY5Pg.

      Of all the dog breeds, pit bull types are the all time number one killer of humans and other people’s beloved pets. The bottom line is this: If people would have picked a safer pet like a beagle over a pit bull types hundreds of people would be alive today and tens of thousands of beloved pets would be alive today. If people would have picked a safer pet like a beagle thousands of people and pets would have been spared a horrific mauling that shatters lives. What other type of dog has the ability to kill humans that would be mistaken for a pit bull type? These families know exactly what breed killed their loved one. Dogsbite.org has all their sources cited. http://www.dogsbite.org/dog-bite-statistics-fatalities-2014.php

    • Claire

      To compare other dogs biting to a pit biting is a bunch of bullshit. If a dash-hound bites you, I don’t think you’re going to have to shoot it or pry it’s jaws apart with a shovel to get it off. There IS A DIFFERENCE and if you can’t see it then you just don’t want to. Pits clamp down and shake and tear their victims to shreds and even continue to attack while people are beating them with shovels, rakes, boards, metal objects, spraying water on them, etc. Other dogs can be dangerous too and I don’t support anyone owning any aggressive dog, but there is a clear problem with this breed that needs to be addressed.