Welcome to the Daxton’s Friends website! Our goal is to serve as a resource for healthy canine pet ownership, and advocate for public safety and animal welfare. Through education, promotional vehicles, and providing resources, we aspire to function as an authority on these topics and serve our communities. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that strives to provide honest and unbiased information.

Daxton’s Friends for Canine Education & Awareness was formed in honor of Daxton Borchardt, who passed away on March 6, 2013 due to severe injuries sustained in a dog attack. Daxton’s Friends would like to educate the public about the importance of understanding dog breeds and how, with proper education and pet care, the number of dog-related incidents can be reduced.

Striving to serve as a resource for the canine community, Daxton’s Friends attempts to provide the most current and updated information available. Relying heavily on media coverage and established canine-related organizations, we pledge to do our best to provide factual information and research. In addition we will also leverage information from real life events, striving to be responsible philanthropists.

If Daxton’s Friends is provided substantial evidence that we have shared incorrect information, we will correct or retract statements. We welcome feedback and invite you to share your thoughts about our organization. Please e-mail us at DaxtonsFriends@gmail.com.     *Abusive and/or deceitful emails are subject to being published in full.*

If you would like to support Daxton’s Friends, please click the donate button below. All contributions will support our efforts to advocate for public safety and animal welfare. As a volunteer organization, we appreciate your support!


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16 thoughts on “Home

  • Pam

    This is very sad! Sad on the part that a child was injured and sad because of uneducated bias on your part. Any dog can be vicious! Some of the most vicious are the nasty little ankle biters! I am a pit bull owner. Trust me when I says my dog would not even make a good bait dog! She is sweet, timid and loving. I have an autistic grandson who adores her and she him.It’s not the dog on the end of the lease hyou need to worry about it’s the one holding the leash! Shame on you! I will be praying for all f you. God bless!

    In response to Jaime Godbey: It’s not in their nature to be vicious! It is from starvation, abuse, neglect and being forced to fight. sometimes inbreeding to bring out the aggressive genes but that happens in all breeds of dogs. They have all been thru it at one time or another – dobies, german shepherd, rotts. That’s like saying because your spouse is an abusive person your child will be too! God’s blessings!

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      “Any dog is capable.”

      Quote:

      “When the “experts” in animal welfare organizations excuse pit bull attacks by telling us that “any” dog is capable of killing us, what does this mean for the future of our pets? Can we believe these same “experts” who tell us that therapy dogs are perfectly safe to have around children and the elderly? If explosive and unpredictable aggression in dogs is considered a “normal” part of dog behavior, can we expect to see dogs banned from more and more public places? If injury from a dog attack is considered an acceptable risk for dog owners, will dog ownership eventually be banned by all rental properties, homeowners and condo associations as “too risky”? Will our children grow up believing that all dogs are dangerous and unpredictable, and that they can never approach or interact with any dog they don’t know? Will they be robbed of the joy of relationships with various canine friends?

      The “experts” have descended upon Chicago to pledge “tougher penalties” for “irresponsible” dog owners. Yet across the country, owners of dangerous dogs are being punished for attacks with prison time, stiff fines, and probation. None of these penalties have served as a deterrent, or have resulted in a reduction of dog attacks. The reality is that most owners of aggressive dogs don’t really believe their animals are capable of killing someone, until it happens. And punishing owners of violent dogs after an attack does nothing to help victims. Such punishments won’t give a mauling victim back her face and it won’t bring a dead child back to life. That’s why it is time for people who love dogs and humans to stand up and say “enough”.

      Read more: http://blog.dogsbite.org/2012/01/saving-mans-best-friend.html?m=1

      ——–

      The plain fact of the matter is that all fighting breeds were genetically selected for their propensity to grab, shake and kill other animals, including their own kind. While Staffies and Bull Terriers have subsequently had the benefit of 100 years of selective breeding as pets and not as fighters (which has changed their genetics for the better), Pit Bulls have virtually no history of being bred as pets and so do not have this advantage. To say that Pit Bulls won’t be inclined to fight and do damage when they are triggered is like saying that Border Collies raised right won’t be inclined to herd! As well-known clicker trainer Gary Wilkes says: “To assert that Pit Bulls are only aggressive if you train them to attack is to deny the existence of every other behaviour-specific breed on the planet… try telling a hunter that he paid $10 000 for a finished field pointer that had to be taught to point. He’ll laugh at you!”

      Read more: http://www.tarynblyth.co.za/articles/pit-bulls-just-like-any-other-dog/

  • Country girl

    There is good and bad in every breed and every owner…to say all pitbulls are bad is wrong as now they are also used as service dogs…yes pitbulls can snap but so do other dogs…i have pit mixes and grandkids and trust them all together…its how there raised and handled

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      “Not all pit bulls are bad”

      If anything, the fact ‘They aren’t all bad’ is what makes the situation even more dangerous than if they were ‘All BAD”. It is this unpredictability, the inability to tell a dangerous from a non-dangerous pit bull that sees pit bulls as an unsuitable breed for society. If they were simply ‘all bad’, society would simply take strong measures to protect themselves from the breed. Nobody is arguing that all pit bulls are bad, the argument is based on the fact that more than enough pit bulls regularly maim, maul and kill to result in an unacceptable actuarial risk, just like drunk driving. Just like all drunk drivers won’t cause harm or kill anybody, doesn’t mean they aren’t participating in high risk behavior.

      People aren’t seeking legislative protection based on the belief all pit bulls are bad, but based on the reality they carry far more risk to innocent people than non fighting breeds of dog. Just as the average person doesn’t want to take the risk of being killed by a drunk driver, the average person also doesn’t want to risk being maimed, mauled or killed by a fighting breed of dog. If they are incapable of understanding such basic self preservation, then there is little hope for them. It must be noted that these people are either risk takers or poor assessors of risk, and quite often have no idea they are putting themselves and others in harms way. It is a battle against stupidity as much as it is dangerous breeds of dog.

      ————-

      A note about Pit Bull types (American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Pit mixes) — We do not recommend these breeds for service dog training for several reasons: 1). Terrier breeds can difficult to train for service work if the dog has the typical independent terrier temperament. Do not assume that the dog you choose will be the exception; 2). Pit types can be genetically dog aggressive, and this may not show in the dog’s temperament until it becomes an adult. If this develops after you have invested a year in training, you will not be able to use the dog in public; 3). You are training a service dog to help make your life better, not more difficult by facing municipal breed specific legislation, breed bans in rental housing, additional insurance costs, and public access challenges.

      Read more: http://handi-dogs.org/home/choosing_a_dog

      ——-

      The Tampa Bay organization, called Pit Bulls 4 Patriots, was founded with the intention of training rescued pit bulls as service dogs for veterans with PTSD. Unfortunately, by the time the Chicago Pits for Patriots had cited them as their inspiration, Pit Bulls 4 Patriots had already been forced to abandon their original concept. They retooled and renamed themselves Hounds 4 Heros, a program that uses rescued greyhounds instead. Why? The pit bulls were not working out as service dogs. They took too long to train, and they found that pit bulls were too “sensitive” to work with handlers with PTSD because they “reflected” the symptoms of their handler’s PTSD. Evidently, the pit bulls were exhibiting common symptoms of PTSD: anger, irritability, hyper-vigilance, and anxiety whenever their owners did. Irritable pit bull service dogs. N o T h a n k Y o u.

      “We became clear that we need dogs who are able to provide calm in any situation rather than matching the handler’s feelings. Also, it is critical that PTSD service dogs can adapt and recover quickly from stress, and to be resiliant enough to do that again and again”

      In addition, the wonderful pit bull “washouts” could not be easily adopted so the founders of the organization are now the proud owners of a boatload of pits. Rescue pit bulls, it seems, are not inherently (genetically), suited to service dog work. Unfortunately Hounds 4 Heros not only took down the page the above quote comes from, there is no archive of it either.

      However, Hounds 4 Heros has written in depth about just what makes rescued greyhounds such great candidates as service dogs for veterans. Knowing that they were forced to scrap their original concept, it is not hard to read between the lines. It seems that greyhounds possess inherent (genetic) characteristics that that make them good PTSD service dogs and pit bulls do not:

      “In our search for the “perfect” PTSD service dog, we are very excited to have Murray join us. Greyhounds tend to be calm, loving but not pushy, caring but not overly sensitive, and are happy to relax and go wherever their person needs them to be.”

      This second quote speaks directly to their experience with pit bulls and they speak to both genetic and a reasonably knowable and appropriate early experience for the greyhounds:
      Our dogs are carefully selected for having exceptionally calm and stable temperaments. We like working with greyhounds because we do not have to train over any strong genetically bred instincts and drives (such as protection/guarding, being territorial, herding,dog aggression, or hunting). It was surprising for us to learn that although some greyhounds have a strong prey drive, most do not. While growing to adulthood in preparation for racing, greyhounds remain in daily contact with their litter mates and other hounds. They are spared from the jarring loss of their pack at an exceedingly young age, unlike most other dogs, who are bred and quickly sold as pets. This continued companionship with their own kind is extremely healthy for balanced brain development and canine social skills. Since they are being groomed to become racing dogs, their lives are disciplined, with plenty of exercise, routines, and very clear guidance from all the humans they come in contact with. As a result, they tend to be peacefully submissive to people, and easily accept direction. This is very helpful in their new roles as service dogs for our PTSD veterans.

      This next quote perfectly explains the very real dangers of trying to shape dogs bred for fighting into service dogs:

      We can’t overstate the importance of the balanced minds and good nature of these dogs for their job as psychiatric service dogs. It is critical that our dogs are going to be calm and stable “on their own” without the necessity of great guidance and leadership from theirhandler. When living with someone who has fluctuating weak energy and leadership skills, such as anyone with a psychiatric disorder, a dog will revert to its genetically bred instincts and/or to default behaviors learned in puppyhood. Skilled training can override weaknesses in temperament and high-drive instinctual behaviors, but our PTSD handlers will not be able to maintain training over the top of thesethings. The longer the team spends together, the more the dog’s training would “unravel” and revert to the genetic predisposition of the dog. Examples of this would be an unbalanced German Shepherd who falls back inappropriately to his instinct to guard and bite when threatened, or a herding dog who neurotically begins nipping at the feet and heels of anything that moves around his person. With the greyhounds their default is to either relax, or quietly withdraw into themselves. As a result, they don’t act out, become dangerously unbalanced, or create problems for their handlers or the public. They are able to maintain and return to their trained behaviors with relativeease.These gentle, intelligent, and malleable dogs respond very well to our positive training methods. They are able to perform the many kinds of tasks and work that most benefit people who face the daunting challenge of living with PTSD.

      And that is the crucial issue for safety – what instincts (genetically controlled behavior) does the dog default to when not under guidance or under the guidance of someone who is not an expert dog handler.

      Read more: http://cravendesires.blogspot.com/2015/02/the-problem-with-pit-bull-service-dogs.html?m=1

      ——–

      “As for “therapy dogs,” there is presently no regulation whatsoever on who can call their dog a therapy dog and who cannot. If my dog holding out a paw makes a sick child smile, I can call him a therapy dog. Pit bull owners whose dogs have harmed other animals or people are notorious for slapping little “therapy dog” vest on their miscreants and photographing them making nice to kids to garner sympathy for their dogs and take the focus off their dogs’ victims. It’s a cynical ploy, but it works with gullible animal lovers, as we have just seen.”

      Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/m/wp/blog.html?b=news.nationalpost.com/full-comment/barabara-kay-sour-grapes-on-pit-bulls

  • Hope

    I was looking up the presa Canario on your site it states that a bull mastiff is a presa and they are two different breeds..but it says there is 115 bites from a presa.. but if you look it up there is only 2 the other attack nobody knows if it was the pits presas or boxers they were all put down..I read the victim thing on your site and none were a presa they were all pit bulls??? So is the site accurate?? Idk I have two presa and a cane Corso and 2 small children I was just inquiring

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      Daxton’s Friends for Canine Education & Awareness was formed in honor of Daxton Borchardt, who passed away on March 6, 2013 due to severe injuries sustained in a dog attack. Daxton’s Friends would like to educate the public about the importance of understanding dog breeds and how, with proper education and pet care, the number of dog-related incidents can be reduced.

      If Daxton’s Friends for Canine Education and Awareness has shared incorrect information we will efficiently correct or retract statements. There must be substantial evidence that there has been an error in order for corrections to be made. Please e-mail all corrections or concerns to us at our email address on our homepage:

      Cane Corso/Italian Mastiff:

      ~snip~

      Both the Roman and the English ancestors of the Cane Corso were bred for hunting large game, to battle in warfare, as a guard dog, and for arena blood ‘sports’. As a hunting dog they were selectively bred to attack game such as wild boar or cougars. One ancient writer described them thus: “not speedy but impetuous, a fighter of great courage and incredible strength, to be employed against bulls and wild boar, undaunted even when confronted with a lion.” They were called canis pugnaces because of their willingness to fight to the death and their function of attacking wild animals. As guard dogs, they were always chained and never had the run of the property, because they were too dangerous. In the arena, they were used in spectacles that involved three or four of these pugnaces / molosser types mauling a bear, a horse or a lion to death slowly, though until the fall of the Roman Empire the victim could also be human (a slave or prisoner)2,3

      The Cane Corso once was popular throughout Italy as a guard dog and fighting dog, but now is most common in Southern Italy. These dogs were just another regional variation of the generic fighting molosser type, sharing its ancestry with the pit bull types and other fighting molossers. In later days, this local Italian fighting molosser was back-crossed to the English fighting pit bull types to improve its performance as a fighting dog and to get its present day appearance – as were most of the various regional molosser types across the world. In 2008, the Cane Corso was accepted into the AKC’s miscellaneous class and declared an official ‘breed’. It remains in fact a molosser – pit bull mix.

      Learn more about the Cane Corso: http://www.daxtonsfriends.com/cane-corso/

      ————

      The fans say that Presa Canarios are calm and affectionate dogs. They may bond well with their owners and can function as companion animals. It is important that all household members are comfortable around the dog and not be timid. This breed has a long and bloody history, and they are still used for dogfighting and shredding large wild animals alive. Like all working breeds, the traits needed for the original tasks are still present. The dogs can maintain their guarding and fighting instincts and have a desire to protect their owners. They are usually extremely territorial.

      Presa Canarios need intense early socialization and training to help deter unwanted and aggressive behaviors. As puppies they can be fun and playful. In time, their behavior and personalities can change as they mature. It cannot be stressed too much that the owner must be confident leaders that are dedicated to observant social interaction and obedience training. All members of the household must be comfortable handling the dog and strictly follow the training guidelines. Presa Canarios are often leery of strangers and can act aggressively towards them. Caution should always be taken when introducing them to strangers because their size and strength can make them very dangerous. They are dangerous for other animals, from horses and cattle to other dogs. They cannot be allowed to roam the neighborhood, and they don’t belong at dog parks, since interrupting attacks on other animals can lead them to redirect the attack onto the human who interferes. They should be walked by someone strong and heavy enough to control the dog. You cannot keep a Presa Canario with any dog of the same sex, and they will often attack even a dog of the opposite sex. You must never leave the Presa Canario at home with other animals unsupervised – they must be locked away until you return.

      Learn more: http://www.daxtonsfriends.com/presa-canario/

  • James Irvin

    i have a mixed pitt and black lab. I must show him i am boss not by abuse, but firm words, he is very gentle but can be stubborn. I think people adobe this breed and expect no problems/ no dog or breed is the same just like humans, each have their own personality, Good and bad in all things in this world.U must look for the good and try to change some bad, you can not be God, but make a good difference.

    My dog (Jude) i got free off of craigslist, he did not know me i did not know him, i was leary on taking him, I thank God everyday i took him , he is my angle with out wings, We have been through alot, he loves to play and act like a puppy at the age of 7, yet he is quite content to be a couch potato
    He accepts my issues and i accept his, we are the best friends for life, DO NOT JUDGE THE BREED, JUDGE THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE THE BREED BAD THAT IS THE BOTTOM LINE,

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      “We thought he was going to be a great dog. He acted like one. He was a good example of a good pit. Until he just decided to attack. He slept in our bed and everything. We never left the kids alone with him. They were never mean to him. We had 5 other dogs including another female pit and they never fought.
      It’s NOT the way they are raised. Our dog was well loved and raised. He obeyed all commands and never showed any aggression. These myths almost cost my sons life. How many more people have to get hurt because of a lie?”
      Jennifer Arp

      “The backdoor was open and suddenly we heard people screaming from outside. Bexar, with zero warning, had lunged at Gavin, and his jaws were clamped down on Gavin’s face, right in front of everyone. Let me point out that there were 8 people within arms reach of Gavin when Bexar attacked. This is a critical point, because I have heard from many people about this, who say that they would never leave their children “alone” with “any” dog. Gavin was far from being alone when this attack happened. Even 4 grown men were unable to pry Bexar’s jaws off of Gavin’s head. Greg ran out and was finally able to get Bexar to release, saving Gavin’s life.”
      Maggie Bain

      “My brother had raised many pit bulls and one particularly captured our hearts…He was the sweetest well mannered gentle dog I had ever seen…I was always told the aggressive ones were because they were trained to fight and it was all in how they were raised….and if u got them from puppies that was the best way to raise any dog…Both of the dogs who attacked were brought home as puppies and picked out by Kara…These dogs never displayed any people aggression. ..Always sat dutifully by her side, watched her have tea parties, sat by her side when she was sick, thought they were lap dogs and liked to snuggle…..no warnings, no snapping, nogrowling…….just snapped!”
      Roxanne Hartrich

      “Children are blessings from God. Dogs are animals, I understand peoples love for animals and a lot of people choose or may not be able to have children so have these dogs and treat them as their own kids. They will always be animals, not children. For those who choose the dangerous breeds please stop and think, is it worth taking the chance on it turning and killing our children and family members?”
      Johnna Harvard

      “Our son was brutally killed by our pet pit bull of 8 years…On April 24, 2013 we lost both our beautiful son Beau and our family dog, affectionately known as Kissy Face. Our dog had been part of our family for 8 years and lived up to her name, for she was eager to overload everyone with kisses. Oh, she was such a very loving and family oriented dog. Kissy Face had been around since her birth on November 22, 2005.
      Then with no warning, matters changed dramatically and our world was irrevocably altered. Shortly after Beau’s 2nd birthday, I made a quick trip to the restroom. Just a few minutes later I returned to find my son lying in a pool of his own blood.”
      Angela Rutledge

      “Her right shoulder was dislocated in a backward fashion, half her right face was missing, as well as part of her right neck, and most of her right ear. My mother had bite marks all over her face, neck, and scalp. Her vocal box was ripped, that’s why my niece only heard one yell. Her C1 & C2 were fractured; part of her spinal cord was ripped from her lifeless body. She fought and fought. She suffered from a horrific, sustained, vicious and violent attack at the jaws of a completely unpredictable breed of dog. My mother’s autopsy report shows her wounds to be consistent with defending her grandchild. The report states that my mother was defending her grandchild. My mother is a hero. She saved my nephew’s life.”
      Ruth Halleran

      Read the full stories and more at: http://www.daxtonsfriends.com/victims-stories/

  • Kevin

    And you guys that feed into this shit, and actually support this group, are sick in the head. You are telling bold faced lies based on your own shitty opinions. If you have never owned a pitbull, you don’t have room to say a word. Karma is a bitch, remember that

  • Kevin

    You and your shitty site can suck a dirty dog dick. You spew hate and misinformation. And you know that you are, but you continue to do so. FUCK you, and I hope you really do get attacked by a dog. Cause that would be Karma.

  • Laura Thompson

    I know Dennis Baker and Kaylie and until the tragic accident,if you will I had no idea how viral these attacks are. I just moved to Nevada and am shocked how many of these brutal and fatal attacks take place out in this desert. Parents, everyone be aware and pay close attention. Our children and Elders are being targeted daily.Please protect yourselves and your precios loved ones and neighbors too. God Bless

  • Jaime Godbey

    I am sickened by some of these comments. Stop humanizing this breed as if it knew or felt a certain way. These dogs snap. It’s im their nature. And in no way in any of these cases is it the victim’s fault! My God. How can any of you making these comments be so cruel and heartless. These are people’s children. They did not ask for any of this. You may be singing a different tune if it were your own child.
    Yes, maybe you have a family pitt that is sweet and innocent. And that is wonderful. But unfortunately for these victim’s they got the dog who’s instincts that day were to kill. Not all dogs can inflict this much damage. This is one of the biggest arguements. If you have small children, why even risk it?? Honestly I was at Mclean County animal shelter in September 2015 looking at a 2yr old pittbull named Niko. My husband loved him, my 11yr old and 8yr old loved him. My 7yr old hmmm? That’s where I paused. And then the man there told me this story of this angel on her 4th birthday being mauled to death by the family pitt. I looked it up. Balled my eyes out and decided against it. I want to thank YOU. I feel like you saved my Children. Possibly, hey. We will never know. After a horrific story like that I wasn’t willing to find out either. Thank you.