Macksburg, OH – 4-year-old girl gets 70 stitches after pit bull type dog attack (4/25/15) 5


Dog bites girl, 70 stitches needed

macksburg+dogApril 25, 2015 – By Jackie Runion – The Marietta Times (jrunion@mariettatimes.com) , Marietta Times

A 4-year-old Macksburg girl was in stable condition Friday after suffering lacerations and puncture wounds from a dog bite Thursday evening.

Washington County Dog Warden Kelly McGilton and emergency personnel responded to the scene at about 5:30 p.m. Thursday after a family friend’s pitbull-mastiff mix reportedly chomped down on the girl’s face, knocking out four teeth and leaving two-inch long lacerations and puncture wounds above both eyes.

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UPDATE: 4-Year Old Dog Bite Victim’s Condition Upgraded to Good

The News Center – 4/24/15

The 4-year old dog bite victim, whose name is not being released in an effort to protect privacy, was flown via helicopter last night to Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus. Officials tell us she was playing with two friends and a neighbor’s dog, when her two friends, ages eleven and ten, went upstairs, she stayed behind with the Mastiff-Pitbull mix.

The little girl suffered two severe lacerations to the face that went all the way through to the inside of her cheeks, as well as two puncture wounds below her eyes. She went through surgery last night; requiring seventy stitches to close those lacerations. She will also need to see an oral surgeon as the dog did take out a few of her teeth.

At this time, authorities do not believe the parents of the victim plan on pressing any charges against the owners of the dog, or the grandfather of the little girl’s friends, who was home at the time of the incident. The dog is currently being kept in a ten-day quarantine at the Humane Society of the Mid-Ohio Valley. Once that seclusion is completed, the dog will be euthanized. It’s a sad situation for everyone involved. But we do have some good news: the little girl’s condition has been updated to good. We all certainly wish her the best in her recovery.

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American Pit Bull Terrier

bullpit1-300x198The American Pit Bull Terrier is, like all the ‘bully’ breeds, one of this group of descendants of the British ‘bull and terrier’ type fighting bulldogs. Once imported into the United States, it was bred up to be bigger again, and again used in baiting animals and in dogfighting. The American Kennel Club (founded 1884) was unwilling to register these fighting dogs, so in 1898 the United Kennel Club was founded specifically to register working pit-fighting dogs and to promote dogfighting. In order to be registered, a dog had to first win three pit fights7,8,9. The American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) became a ‘breed’. As dogfighting declined in popularity in the 1930s and 1940s, Colby (the most famous and prolific breeder of these dogs) began to search for a new market and began promoting the APBT as family pets10,11. This despite the fact that his breeding lines included child killers12.

The APBT is of medium intelligence, and it is athletic. They have plenty of energy and exuberance for life. They are affectionate companions are often referred to as a “nanny dog”, which leads many families to believe that they are suitable companions for children. Many can live happily with children and never have an issue, but there are many cases of the family pit bull suddenly attacking or killing a child in the household. The Pit Bull advocacy group BADRAP recently retracted their original “nanny dog” statements (https://www.facebook.com/BADRAP.org/posts/10151460774472399)13.In 2013 and 2014, in the United States, 27 children were killed by Pit Bulls and their mixes. Most of these children were killed by family pet pit bulls that had never been neglected or abused and had always loved the child. As with all breeds, the traits needed for their original tasks remain in the dogs – in this case, the sudden explosive aggression that was necessary to survive in the fighting pit. An APBT may never show this aggression, but if it does there will be no warning and the attack will not be easy to stop. Extreme caution should always be taken when this breed interacts with children. They are fun loving dogs that have “clownish” behaviors. Despite, their many positive qualities, this breed may not be suitable for everyone. Their high energy requires a family that can accommodate and appreciate this aspect of their personality. They usually do best with active families. Many American Pit Bull Terriers get calmer as they age and an older dog may work for a more reserved family.

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Why do we call them ‘Pit Bull Type Dogs?'”

pit bull type dogsThe arms race

Most lately we’ve seen a modern arms race in circles that favor this type of inherently dangerous dog, leading to the mixing of ever more local mastiff types with fighting bulldog / pit bull types. The fans of the new mix then apply to kennel clubs to have their own pit bull – mastiff mix recognized as a new ‘breed’. It’s this arms race, with its greed for cash, that has given us the many pit bull mixes people are now pretending are a separate mastiff ‘breed’: the ‘Cane Corso’, ‘Dogo Argentino’, ‘Dogue de Bordeaux’, ‘Bullmastiff’, to name a few.

The instant a kennel club dispenses a new official name for such a mix, the mix’s fans start to claim that their ‘breed’ is distinct. Suddenly the newest pit fighting bulldog – mastiff mix is a ‘breed’ that has nothing to do with any other pit bull, mastiff, or pit bull – mastiff mix, as if the new mix’s genes materialized out of thin air.

In fact, these pit bull – mastiff mixes are pit bull type dogs, no less than any other backyard-bred pit bull mix.

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POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS DOG BREEDS

This is a list of dog breeds that have a history of being potentially dangerous to people, especially children. Daxton’s Friends for Canine Education and Awareness understands that any dog has the ability to bite or inflict serious harm to humans. This list consists of several dog breeds that have a higher than average number of recorded human fatalities. Please use extreme caution if you choose to bring one of these breeds into your home. Rental communities and homeowners insurance may restrict many of the dog breeds on this list due to the likelihood of a serious incident.

Pit Bulls, Mastiff, and Rottweiler lead in fatalities and are listed first. The rest of the breeds are listed in alphabetical order:

potentially-dangerous-dog-300x300Pit Bull Terrier Family

Mastiffs

Rottweiler

Akita

Boxer

Alaskan Malamute

Chow Chow

Doberman Pinscher

German Shepherd

Shar Pei

Siberian Husky

Wolf Hybrid


OHIO – Sub. H.B. 14 – 129th General Assembly

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5 thoughts on “Macksburg, OH – 4-year-old girl gets 70 stitches after pit bull type dog attack (4/25/15)

  • Leigha

    So what do you think of the millions of pitbulls in homes who you never hear about in the news? You know, the ones living peacefully with cats, children, other dogs, the ones who are therapy or service dogs, the ones who never have and never will do something that causes them to become a news story.. Do you think those millions of pit bull type dogs are ticking time bombs? Does your hate spill over onto those dogs as well simply because of how they look ?

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      Yes.

      “We thought he was going to be a great dog. He acted like one. He was a good example of a good pit. Until he just decided to attack. He slept in our bed and everything. We never left the kids alone with him. They were never mean to him. We had 5 other dogs including another female pit and they never fought.
      It’s NOT the way they are raised. Our dog was well loved and raised. He obeyed all commands and never showed any aggression. These myths almost cost my sons life. How many more people have to get hurt because of a lie?”
      Jennifer Arp

      “The backdoor was open and suddenly we heard people screaming from outside. Bexar, with zero warning, had lunged at Gavin, and his jaws were clamped down on Gavin’s face, right in front of everyone. Let me point out that there were 8 people within arms reach of Gavin when Bexar attacked. This is a critical point, because I have heard from many people about this, who say that they would never leave their children “alone” with “any” dog. Gavin was far from being alone when this attack happened. Even 4 grown men were unable to pry Bexar’s jaws off of Gavin’s head. Greg ran out and was finally able to get Bexar to release, saving Gavin’s life.”
      Maggie Bain

      “My brother had raised many pit bulls and one particularly captured our hearts…He was the sweetest well mannered gentle dog I had ever seen…I was always told the aggressive ones were because they were trained to fight and it was all in how they wereraised….and if u got them from puppies that was the best way to raise any dog…Both of the dogs who attacked were brought home as puppies and picked out by Kara…These dogs never displayed any people aggression. ..Always sat dutifully by her side, watched her have tea parties, sat by her side when she was sick, thought they were lap dogs and liked to snuggle…..no warnings, no snapping, nogrowling…….just snapped!”
      Roxanne Hartrich

      “Children are blessings from God. Dogs are animals, I understand peoples love for animals and a lot of people choose or may not be able to have children so have these dogs and treat them as their own kids. They will always be animals, not children. For those who choose the dangerous breeds please stop and think, is it worth taking the chance on it turning and killing our children and family members?”
      Johnna Harvard

      “Our son was brutally killed by our pet pit bull of 8 years…On April 24, 2013 we lost both our beautiful son Beau and our family dog, affectionately known as Kissy Face. Our dog had been part of our family for 8 years and lived up to her name, for she was eager to overload everyone with kisses. Oh, she was such a very loving and family oriented dog. Kissy Face had been around since her birth on November 22, 2005. 
      Then with no warning, matters changed dramatically and our world was irrevocably altered. Shortly after Beau’s 2nd birthday, I made a quick trip to the restroom. Just a few minutes later I returned to find my son lying in a pool of his own blood.”
      Angela Rutledge

      “Her right shoulder was dislocated in a backward fashion, half her right face was missing, as well as part of her right neck, and most of her right ear. My mother had bite marks all over her face, neck, and scalp. Her vocal box was ripped, that’s why my niece only heard one yell. Her C1 & C2 were fractured; part of her spinal cord was ripped from her lifeless body. She fought and fought. She suffered from a horrific, sustained, vicious and violent attack at the jaws of a completely unpredictable breed of dog. My mother’s autopsy report shows her wounds to be consistent with defending her grandchild. The report states that my mother was defending her grandchild. My mother is a hero. She saved my nephew’s life.” 
      Ruth Halleran

      Read the full stories and more at: https://www.daxtonsfriends.com/victims-stories/

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      Abstract

      OBJECTIVE:

      Maiming and death due to dog bites are uncommon but preventable tragedies. We postulated that patients admitted to a level I trauma center with dog bites would have severe injuries and that the gravest injuries would be those caused by pit bulls.

      DESIGN:

      We reviewed the medical records of patients admitted to our level I trauma center with dog bites during a 15-year period. We determined the demographic characteristics of the patients, their outcomes, and the breed and characteristics of the dogs that caused the injuries.

      RESULTS:

      Our Trauma and Emergency Surgery Services treated 228 patients with dog bite injuries; for 82 of those patients, the breed of dog involved was recorded (29 were injured by pit bulls). Compared with attacks by other breeds of dogs, attacks by pit bulls were associated with a higher median Injury Severity Scale score (4 vs. 1; P = 0.002), a higher risk of an admission Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or lower (17.2% vs. 0%; P = 0.006), higher median hospital charges ($10,500 vs. $7200; P = 0.003), and a higher risk of death (10.3% vs. 0%; P = 0.041).

      CONCLUSIONS:

      Attacks by pit bulls are associated with higher morbidity rates, higher hospital charges, and a higher risk of death than are attacks by other breeds of dogs. Strict regulation of pit bulls may substantially reduce the US mortality rates related to dog bites.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21475022

  • caoilin

    Pitbulls are NOT meant to be fighting dogs, they are NOT meant to be ripping people apart. Their genetics are actually abnormally bred to MAKE them fighters!! Agression is bred into them! Pitbulls were originally needed/ used/ bred as NANNY DOGS for god sakes!! Im not a hippie, im not a liberal, and im not going to say that all dogs are good, but more deadly and fatal bites come from CHIHUAHUAS than all other dogs COMBINED every year! This dog was bred to fight, to harm, but he was never MEANT to do so, based on genetics! This dog was TAUGHT to fight and BRED to be agressive! Thats the protective instinct in them!! They believe they are protecting something they have been fooled to love! If I told you that your most loved one was going to die if you did not fight another person, you would fight! do you all blame the pitbulls? or the a$$holes who use them and their loyalty and their strength for a get rich quick scheme?

    • Daxtons Friends Post author

      It’s Dog Bite Prevention Week. Did you know that there was never such thing as a ‘Nanny’s Dog’? This term was a recent invention created to describe the myriad of vintage photos of children enjoying their family pit bulls. While the intention behind the term was innocent, using it may mislead parents into being careless with their children around their family dog – A recipe for dog bites! 

      https://m.facebook.com/BADRAP.org/posts/10151460774472399

      ———
      Go ahead and prove me wrong, not with a single primary source, but with a preponderance of evidence that demonstrates the incredible existence of the baby loving fighting dog that was so beloved and so popular in times gone by that it was commonly called the nanny dog.  

      Read more: https://thetruthaboutpitbulls.blogspot.com/2010/08/nanny-dog-myth-revealed.html
      ——-
      “PIT BULLS USED TO BE NANNY DOGS”

      The Myth:
      To explain vintage black and white photographs that depicted children and pit bulls together, a story was created that back in the Victorian age the pit bull was the “nanny dog”. These so-called nanny dogs were said to be so good with children parents relied on them to babysit and protect them.

      The Reality:
      One fighting breed advocate created this “legend” in 1971 to distance her breed from its fighting origins. This mention was picked up by a newspaper in 1987 and has since been promoted as historical “fact.”

      At no point in history were pit bulls ever “nanny dogs”. There has not been any proof ever given to make this myth a reality. The pit bull advocacy group “BADRAP” (Bay Area Dog Lovers Responsible About Pit Bulls) recently admitted that pit bulls were never nanny dogs and that this myth was dangerous to children. The retraction of the “nanny dog myth” has been highly publicized. Despite the retraction, the myth has lived on and pit bull advocates still repeat it regularly

      “Did you know that there was never such thing as a ‘Nanny’s Dog’? This term was a recent invention created to describe the myriad of vintage photos of children enjoying their family pit bulls (click this link for details about vintage photos). While the intention behind the term was innocent, using it may mislead parents into being careless with their children around their family dog – A recipe for dog bites!”   —–   

      https://www.daxtonsfriends.com/canine-myths-2/